Get-MailboxFolderPermission

Get-MailboxFolderPermission PowerShell Exchange Online

To review permissions set on mailbox folders, you can use the Get-MailboxFolderPermission CmdLet.

This PowerShell command is part of the Exchange Online Management module, which you can download and install by using the following command:

Install-Module ExchangeOnlineManagement

With the module installed, you can start querying mailbox folders using the following syntax:

Get-MailboxFolderPermission [mailbox id]:\[folder path]

As seen below, the [mailbox id] is flexible and supports using both the alias or any of the email addresses configured on the mailbox:

PS C:\> Get-MailboxFolderPermission hans.c.orsted@skrubbeltrang.mail.onmicrosoft.com:\Calendar
FolderName           User                 AccessRights                                                                                               SharingPermissionFlags
----------           ----                 ------------                                                                                               ----------------------
Calendar             Default              {AvailabilityOnly}
Calendar             Anonymous            {None}

PS C:\> Get-MailboxFolderPermission hans.c.orsted@azure.skrubbeltrang.com:\Calendar
FolderName           User                 AccessRights                                                                                               SharingPermissionFlags
----------           ----                 ------------                                                                                               ----------------------
Calendar             Default              {AvailabilityOnly}
Calendar             Anonymous            {None}

PS C:\> Get-MailboxFolderPermission hans.c.orsted:\Calendar
FolderName           User                 AccessRights                                                                                               SharingPermissionFlags
----------           ----                 ------------                                                                                               ----------------------
Calendar             Default              {AvailabilityOnly}
Calendar             Anonymous            {None}

As for the [folder path], it is case-insensitive but can be affected by the localization of the mailbox.

Continue reading to find a general solution to this challenge.

Using Get-MailboxFolderPermission on Localized Standard Folders

In some cases you’ll receive an error when trying to retrieve permissions from the Calendar folder:

The operation couldn't be performed because '[user]:\Calendar' couldn't be found.
  + CategoryInfo: NotSpecified: (:) 
  [Get-MailboxFolderPermission], ManagementObjectNotFoundException

The is caused by the standard folders being localized if the user has set the language during the first login to the mailbox.

So, e.g., in Germany, the Calendar folder would be named “Kalender,” and in France, it would be “Calendrier,” etc.

This could be challenging if you’re working in an international environment where Outlook folders are not standardized.

To solve this, you can look up the localized name using the Get-MailboxFolderStatistics CmdLet:

PS C:\> Get-MailboxFolderStatistics hans.c.orsted -FolderScope Calendar | ft Name,FolderPath,FolderType
Name                   FolderPath              FolderType
----                   ----------              ----------
Calendar               /Calendar               Calendar
Birthdays              /Birthdays              BirthdayCalendar
United States holidays /United States holidays User Created

The FolderType attribute will always be “Calendar” for the standard Calendar folder (irrespective of localization).

So, if you need to look up the localized path of the Calendar folder, you can use the following PowerShell command:

(Get-MailboxFolderStatistics hans.c.orsted -FolderScope Calendar | ? { $_.FolderType -eq 'Calendar' }).FolderPath

Mailbox Folder Permission Types

The mailbox folder permissions returned by Get-MailboxFolderPermission are composed of either granular permissions or roles. Roles are combinations of individual permissions.

Usually, the use of roles should suit your needs. You’ll find an overview of roles and corresponding permissions here.

You can add new permissions using the Add-MailboxFolderPermission PowerShell command.

You can modify existing permissions using the Set-MailboxFolderPermission.

To enable your first-level support team to configure calendar delegation easily, you should consider using a third-party GUI tool like Easy365Manager.

Configuring Calendar Permissions Without PowerShell

Many admins like to avoid complex PowerShell scripts to empower their first-level support team.

This is why hundreds of companies now use Easy365Manager to grant easy GUI access to calendar permission configuration.

Easy365Manager is a small-footprint snap-in to Active Directory Users & Computers. You can install Easy365Manager to any server or PC running AD Users & Computers, and there’s no change to your infrastructure.

The installation takes less than a minute and allows you to configure your Office 365 licenses and mailboxes directly from AD user properties.

With Easy365Manager, any first-level supporter can easily handle calendar permission change requests:

Using Easy365Manager, you can move semi-complex tasks like calendar permission configuration and Outlook auto-mapping of shared mailboxes to your first-level support team.

This will allow back-end admins to perform more meaningful tasks – like speeding up your cloud transition.

Easy365Manager is available as a free 30-day trial.

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